Melbourne 

Melbourne was one of the places I was looking forward to seeing most on my trip and it’s didn’t  disappoint. 

However after the tranquillity of Hobart it’s did feel like I had been hit by a wall of sound, light and people for the first few days. 

Accessibility in melbourne was pretty good and  disabled people were a lot more visible than in other cities 

Melbourne is a city for eating in and most restaurants had pretty good access I suspect that you can get virtually any cuisine imaginable in melbourne.

Transport 

Apart from the airport transfer bus (sky bus) and the train  which was very accessible and easy to use getting around central melbourne by public transport was challenge with little information about access. For example although many trams are accessible to wheelchair users outside zone 1 very few stops are. Also tourist information struggled to give us information on access. Also I was surprised at the  lack for audio information on  transport. 

We hired a car for some of our visit predominantly because I  wanted to go to Philip island. 

Things to do

National  gallery victoria

Free entry diverse  range of art and good access made this a must stop for me.

Philip island 

I love penguins so when I  found out about a place you could get close to them in nature it became a must see. It is about  two  hours drive from Melbourne and although there are tours from Melbourne couldn’t find any accessible ones so we hired a car and that gave us freedom to  explore the rest of the island before the penguin parade. Access for the attractions was good we did the penguin parade, kola walkway and heritage farm.

Acmi
The equivalent of the bfi in London but with an awesome  free exhibition on the history of  moving  image in Australia.  It has loads of interactive  stuff including a 360 motion capture booth so you can do your own matrix moves.

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Author: zarasadventure

I am a human rights activist from the UK. I have a background in disability and participation work. I identify as a disabled person and Feminist. I belive in equity and using intersectional and approaches.

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